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Ambulatory activity interacts with common risk factors for osteoarthritis to modify increases in MRI-detected osteophytes

Citation

Zhu, Z and Aitken, D and Cicuttini, F and Jones, G and Ding, C, Ambulatory activity interacts with common risk factors for osteoarthritis to modify increases in MRI-detected osteophytes, Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, 27, (4) pp. 650-658. ISSN 1063-4584 (2019) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2019 Osteoarthritis Research Society International

DOI: doi:10.1016/j.joca.2018.12.023

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the longitudinal association between objectively measured ambulatory activity (AA) and knee MRI-detected osteophytes (OPs), and to test whether this relationship was modified by common risk factors for OA including sex, obesity, disease severity and knee injury history.

Methods: 408 community-dwelling adults aged 51-81 years were assessed at baseline and 2.7 years. T1-weighted fat-suppressed MRI was used to evaluate knee OPs at both time points. AA was assessed at baseline by pedometers and categorized as: less active (≤7499 steps per day), moderately active (7500-9999 steps per day) and highly active (≥10,000 steps per day).

Results: Statistically significant interactions were detected between knee OA risk factors and AA on increases in MRI-detected OPs (all P < 0.05). In stratified analyses, being moderately active, compared to being less active, was protective against an increase in MRI-detected OPs (score change of ≥1) in females (relative risk (RR) = 0.42, 95%CI, 0.25-0.70, P < 0.01), those who were obese (RR = 0.50, 95%CI, 0.30-0.83, P < 0.01), those with radiographic OA (ROA) (RR = 0.68, 95%CI, 0.47-0.97, P = 0.02) and those with a history of knee injury (RR = 0.27, 95%CI, 0.08-0.88, P = 0.02) in almost every knee compartment, after adjustment for confounders. No statistically significant associations were found in males, non-obese, non-ROA or non-injury groups.

Conclusions: Being moderately active is protective against an increase in MRI-detected OPs in females, those with ROA, those who are obese and those with a history of knee injury. These findings suggest that being moderately active is beneficial for individuals who are at higher risk of knee OA.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:ambulatory activity, magnetic resonance imaging, osteoarthritis, osteophytes, risk factors
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Clinical Sciences
Research Field:Rheumatology and Arthritis
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Skeletal System and Disorders (incl. Arthritis)
UTAS Author:Zhu, Z (Mr Zhaohua Zhu)
UTAS Author:Aitken, D (Associate Professor Dawn Aitken)
UTAS Author:Jones, G (Professor Graeme Jones)
UTAS Author:Ding, C (Professor Chang-Hai Ding)
ID Code:131524
Year Published:2019
Web of Science® Times Cited:1
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2019-03-21
Last Modified:2019-04-08
Downloads:0

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