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Youth and long-term dietary calcium intake with risk of impaired glucose metabolism and type 2 diabetes in adulthood

Citation

Wu, F and Juonala, M and Pahkala, K and Buscot, M-J and Sabin, MA and Pitkanen, N and Ronnemaa, T and Jula, A and Lehtimaki, T and Hutri-Kahonen, N and Kahonen, M and Laitinen, T and Viikari, JSA and Raitakari, OT and Magnussen, CG, Youth and long-term dietary calcium intake with risk of impaired glucose metabolism and type 2 diabetes in adulthood, Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 104, (6) pp. 2067-2074. ISSN 0021-972X (2019) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

Copyright 2019 Endocrine Society

DOI: doi:10.1210/jc.2018-02321

Abstract

Context: No previous studies have examined the role of youth calcium intake in the development of impaired glucose metabolism, particularly those with long-term high calcium intake.

Objectives: To examine whether youth and long-term (between youth and adulthood) dietary calcium intake is associated with adult impaired glucose metabolism and T2D.

Design, Setting, and Participants: The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study (YFS) is a 31-year prospective cohort study (n=1134, aged 3-18 years at baseline).

Exposures: Dietary calcium intake was assessed at baseline (1980) and adult follow-ups (2001, 2007 and 2011). Long-term (mean between youth and adulthood) dietary calcium intake was calculated.

Main outcome measures: Adult impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and T2D.

Results: We found no evidence for non-linear associations between calcium intake with IFG or T2D among females and males (all P for non-linearity > 0.05). Higher youth and long-term dietary calcium intake was not associated with the risk of IFG or T2D among females or males after adjustment for confounders including youth and adult BMI.

Conclusions: Youth or long-term dietary calcium intake is not associated with adult risk of developing impaired glucose metabolism or T2D.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Health Sciences
Research Group:Epidemiology
Research Field:Epidemiology not elsewhere classified
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical health
Objective Field:Clinical health not elsewhere classified
UTAS Author:Wu, F (Dr Feitong Wu)
UTAS Author:Buscot, M-J (Dr Marie-Jeanne Buscot)
UTAS Author:Magnussen, CG (Associate Professor Costan Magnussen)
ID Code:131219
Year Published:2019
Web of Science® Times Cited:3
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2019-03-06
Last Modified:2020-04-08
Downloads:9 View Download Statistics

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