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'Antarctica just has this hero factor...': Gendered barriers to Australian Antarctic research and remote fieldwork

Citation

Nash, M and Nielsen, HEF and Shaw, J and King, MA and Lea, MA and Bax, N, 'Antarctica just has this hero factor...': Gendered barriers to Australian Antarctic research and remote fieldwork, PLoS ONE, 14, (1) Article e0209983. ISSN 1932-6203 (2019) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

Copyright 2019 Nash et al. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

DOI: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0209983

Abstract

Antarctica is often associated with images of masculine figures battling against the blizzard. The pervasiveness of heroic white masculine leadership and exploration in Antarctica and, more broadly, in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, and Medicine (STEMM) research cultures, has meant women have had lesser access to Antarctic research and fieldwork opportunities, with a marked increase since the 1980s. This article presents findings from an exploratory online survey examining how 95 women experienced research and remote Antarctic fieldwork with the Australian Antarctic Program. Although women are entering polar science in greater numbers, a key theme of the qualitative findings of this survey is that gendered barriers to participation in research and fieldwork persist. We discuss five key gendered barriers including: 1) Physical barriers, 2) Caring responsibilities/unpaid work, 3) Cultural sexism/gender bias, 4) Lack of opportunities/recognition, and 5) Unwanted male attention/sexual harassment. We argue that the lack of attention paid to gender and sexuality in polar fieldwork contributes to the invisibility and exclusion of women and other marginalized identities broadly. To conclude, we point to the importance of targeted inclusivity, diversity and equity initiatives through Antarctic research globally and specifically by National Antarctic Programs.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:women in STEMM, antarctica, fieldwork, gender
Research Division:Studies in Human Society
Research Group:Sociology
Research Field:Social Change
Objective Division:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Group:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Field:Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
UTAS Author:Nash, M (Dr Meredith Nash)
UTAS Author:Nielsen, HEF (Dr Hanne Nielsen)
UTAS Author:Shaw, J (Dr Justine Shaw)
UTAS Author:King, MA (Professor Matt King)
UTAS Author:Lea, MA (Associate Professor Mary-Anne Lea)
UTAS Author:Bax, N (Ms Narissa Bax)
ID Code:130499
Year Published:2019
Deposited By:Office of the School of Social Sciences
Deposited On:2019-01-29
Last Modified:2019-07-02
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