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Association between musculoskeletal pain at multiple sites and objectively measured physical activity and work capacity: Results from UK Biobank study

Citation

Pan, F and Byrne, KS and Ramakrishnan, R and Ferreira, M and Dwyer, T and Jones, G, Association between musculoskeletal pain at multiple sites and objectively measured physical activity and work capacity: Results from UK Biobank study, Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport pp. 1-6. ISSN 1440-2440 (2018) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2018 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd

DOI: doi:10.1016/j.jsams.2018.10.008

Abstract

Objectives: To describe the cross-sectional association between musculoskeletal pain at multiple sites and physical work capacity (PWC) and objectively measured physical activity (PA).

Design: Observational study.

Methods: Data from a subsample of the UK Biobank were utilised (n=9856; mean age 58.5 years, mean body mass index 30.2kg/m2, 62% female). PWC was measured by a bicycle ergometer and PA by an accelerometer. Pain experienced in hip, knee, back and neck/shoulder was collected by questionnaire. Linear regression modelling was used with adjustment for potential confounders to estimate the association between pain and PWC and PA.

Results: Increase in number of painful sites was associated with lower PWC, moderate and vigorous PA and increased low intensity PA in a dose-response relationship (all p-values for trend ≤0.001) before and after adjustment for confounders. In site specific analyses, hip pain was associated with an increased low intensity PA (β 52.8min/week, 95% CI 2.3-103.2) and reduced moderate PA (β -50.1min/week, 95% CI -98.5 to -1.8). Knee pain was only associated with vigorous PA (β -5.7min/week, 95% CI -10.0 to -1.3). Pain at neck/shoulder pain and back were not independently associated with PWC and PA.

Conclusions: Greater number of painful sites is consistently associated with poorer PWC, increased low intensity PA and reduced moderate to vigorous PA. Clinicians should address the critical role of being physically active in managing chronic musculoskeletal pain and interventions targeting musculoskeletal pain may be needed to increase PA levels.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:multiple site pain, musculoskeletal pain, physical activity, physical work capacity
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Human Movement and Sports Science
Research Field:Sports Medicine
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Skeletal System and Disorders (incl. Arthritis)
UTAS Author:Pan, F (Dr Feng Pan)
UTAS Author:Dwyer, T (Professor Terry Dwyer)
UTAS Author:Jones, G (Professor Graeme Jones)
ID Code:129428
Year Published:2018
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2018-11-29
Last Modified:2019-08-02
Downloads:0

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