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Fake News: Medicines Misinformation by the Media

Citation

Thomas, J and Peterson, GM and Walker, E and Christenson, JK and Cowley, M and Kosari, S and Baby, KE and Naunton, M, Fake News: Medicines Misinformation by the Media, Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 104, (6) pp. 1059-1061. ISSN 0009-9236 (2018) [Contribution to Refereed Journal]


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DOI: doi:10.1002/cpt.1199

Abstract

Mainstream broadcasting media is a potentially powerful avenue for disseminating wellness education. For example, it can be used for community-based risk management, including preparing for pandemic events. The media can have a considerable positive impact on the public by increasing their health knowledge, changing attitudes and intentions, and influencing health behavior. However, although the broadcasting media can usefully convey prosocial, healthy messages, there is also a risk of propagating incorrect and antisocial, poor public health information.

Item Details

Item Type:Contribution to Refereed Journal
Keywords:misinformation drug information
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Research Field:Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health)
Objective Field:Behaviour and Health
UTAS Author:Peterson, GM (Professor Gregory Peterson)
ID Code:129283
Year Published:2018
Deposited By:College Office - CHM
Deposited On:2018-11-20
Last Modified:2018-11-26
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