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Access to and consumption of regionally-grown fresh fruit and vegetables in Tasmania

Citation

Kent, K and Hoogesteger, A and Murray, S and Auckland, S and Godrich, S, Access to and consumption of regionally-grown fresh fruit and vegetables in Tasmania, Rural Health and Collaborative Research Symposium, 20 September 2018, Launceston, Tasmania (2018) [Conference Extract]


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Abstract

Background: Access to and consumption of regionally-grown fresh fruits and vegetables (FFV) may be limited in agriculturally-productive regions of Tasmania, with significant health and socio-economic implications. This pilot study aimed to measure access to and consumption of regionally-grown fresh fruit and vegetables (FFV) in Tasmania, and compare the results across levels of rurality.

Methods: A survey measured purchasing patterns and enabling factors related to accessing and consuming regionally-grown FFV, and consumption of regionally-grown FFV as a proportion of overall FFV intake. A cross-sectional pilot study was conducted using a convenience sample of Tasmanian adults. Data were coded into ARIA remoteness categories. Chi-square statistics and one-way ANOVA compared results according to rurality.

Results: Respondents (n=104, female=68%, inner-regional residing=81%, income $80,000- $100,000=52%, tertiary educated=86%) perceived regionally-grown FFV as ‘very important’ (67%). Respondents accessed regionally-grown FFV at supermarkets (96%), fruit & vegetable shops (74%), farmers markets (65%), and 74% grow their own, with no difference according to rurality. Respondents reported wanting to know where their FFV is grown (92%), and reported already knowing how to access (81%) and prepare (90%) the FFV. Financial support of community (91%) and farmers (93%) were major enabling factors. On average, 47% vegetables and 62% fruit consumed were estimated as regionally-grown, with no difference according to rurality (p>0.05).

Conclusion: Respondents favoured and frequently accessed regionally-grown FFV, and they contributed a large proportion of overall FFV intake, regardless of rurality. However, respondents were highly-educated, had high income, and based in inner-regional areas, limiting the generalisability of these pilot findings.

Item Details

Item Type:Conference Extract
Keywords:regional food, tasmanian, fruit, vegetables
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Nutrition and Dietetics
Research Field:Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health)
Objective Field:Nutrition
Author:Kent, K (Dr Katherine Kent)
Author:Hoogesteger, A (Miss Ashley Hoogesteger)
Author:Murray, S (Ms Sandra Murray)
Author:Auckland, S (Mr Stuart Auckland)
ID Code:128711
Year Published:2018
Deposited By:Centre for Rural Health
Deposited On:2018-10-08
Last Modified:2018-10-10
Downloads:0

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