eCite Digital Repository

Simulation and feedback in health education: A mixed methods study comparing three simulation modalities

Citation

Tait, L and Lee, K and Rasiah, R and Cooper, JM and Ling, T and Geelan, B and Bindoff, I, Simulation and feedback in health education: A mixed methods study comparing three simulation modalities, Pharmacy, 6, (2) Article 41. ISSN 2226-4787 (2018) [Refereed Article]


Preview
PDF
300Kb
  

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2018 The Authors. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

DOI: doi:10.3390/pharmacy6020041

Abstract

Background: There are numerous approaches to simulating a patient encounter in pharmacy education. However, little direct comparison between these approaches has been undertaken. Our objective was to investigate student experiences, satisfaction, and feedback preferences between three scenario simulation modalities (paper-, actor-, and computer-based).

Methods: We conducted a mixed methods study with randomized cross-over of simulation modalities on final-year Australian graduate-entry Master of Pharmacy students. Participants completed case-based scenarios within each of three simulation modalities, with feedback provided at the completion of each scenario in a format corresponding to each simulation modality. A post-simulation questionnaire collected qualitative and quantitative responses pertaining to participant satisfaction, experiences, and feedback preferences.

Results: Participants reported similar levels satisfaction across all three modalities. However, each modality resulted in unique positive and negative experiences, such as student disengagement with paper-based scenarios.

Conclusion: Importantly, the themes of guidance and opportunity for peer discussion underlie the best forms of feedback for students. The provision of feedback following simulation should be carefully considered and delivered, with all three simulation modalities producing both positive and negative experiences in regard to their feedback format.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:pharmacy education, health education, simulation, scenarios, computer, virtual, virtual patient, standardised patient, actor, paper-based
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Research Field:Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacy Practice
Objective Division:Education and Training
Objective Group:Teaching and Instruction
Objective Field:Teaching and Instruction Technologies
UTAS Author:Ling, T (Dr Tristan Ling)
UTAS Author:Geelan, B (Mr Benjamin Geelan)
UTAS Author:Bindoff, I (Dr Ivan Bindoff)
ID Code:127773
Year Published:2018
Deposited By:Pharmacy
Deposited On:2018-08-15
Last Modified:2019-01-21
Downloads:69 View Download Statistics

Repository Staff Only: item control page