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Potential of summer-active temperate (C3) perennial forages to mitigate the detrimental effects of supraoptimal temperatures on summer home-grown feed production in south-eastern Australian dairying regions

Citation

Langworthy, AD and Rawnsley, RP and Freeman, MJ and Pembleton, KG and Corkrey, R and Harrison, MT and Lane, PA and Henry, DA, Potential of summer-active temperate (C3) perennial forages to mitigate the detrimental effects of supraoptimal temperatures on summer home-grown feed production in south-eastern Australian dairying regions, Crop and Pasture Science, 69, (8) pp. 808-820. ISSN 1836-0947 (2018) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2018 CSIRO

DOI: doi:10.1071/CP17291

Abstract

In many south-eastern Australian dairying regions, supraoptimal ambient temperatures (Ta > 30C) often challenge the perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.)-dominated feed-base during the summer months. A glasshouse experiment was undertaken to identify alternative summer-active temperate (C3) perennial forages more tolerant of supraoptimal temperature stress (day/night Ta of 38/25C) than perennial ryegrass. Supraoptimal temperature stress was imposed both with and without irrigation. Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) was the only species to survive 18 days of combined supraoptimal temperature stress and non-irrigation. Lucerne (Medicago sativa L.), plantain (Plantago lanceolate L.), and tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) survived 12 days of this treatment. Twelve days of exposure to these conditions caused death of perennial ryegrass, prairie grass (Bromus catharticus Vahl.), cocksfoot (Dactylis glomerate L.), birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.), and red clover (Trifolium pratense L.). Irrigation (daily to through drainage) mitigated detrimental effects of imposed supraoptimal temperature stress on the growth and survival of all species. Chicory and to a lesser extent lucerne, plantain, and tall fescue may have a role to play in south-eastern Australian dairying regions, where supraoptimal temperature stress is a frequent and ongoing issue.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:chlorophyll fluorescence, drought, heat stress, heat tolerance, thermotolerance, water stress
Research Division:Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
Research Group:Crop and Pasture Production
Research Field:Crop and Pasture Improvement (Selection and Breeding)
Objective Division:Animal Production and Animal Primary Products
Objective Group:Pasture, Browse and Fodder Crops
Objective Field:Sown Pastures (excl. Lucerne)
UTAS Author:Langworthy, AD (Mr Adam Langworthy)
UTAS Author:Rawnsley, RP (Dr Richard Rawnsley)
UTAS Author:Freeman, MJ (Mr Mark Freeman)
UTAS Author:Corkrey, R (Dr Ross Corkrey)
UTAS Author:Harrison, MT (Dr Matthew Harrison)
UTAS Author:Lane, PA (Associate Professor Peter Lane)
ID Code:127502
Year Published:2018
Web of Science® Times Cited:3
Deposited By:TIA - Research Institute
Deposited On:2018-08-01
Last Modified:2019-08-06
Downloads:0

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