eCite Digital Repository

Onset symptoms, tobacco smoking, and progressive-onset phenotype are associated with a delayed onset of multiple sclerosis, and marijuana use with an earlier onset

Citation

Tao, C and Simpson Jr, S and Taylor, BV and Blizzard, L and Lucas, RM and Ponsonby, A-L and Broadly, S and van der Mei, I, AusLong/Ausimmune Investigators Group, Onset symptoms, tobacco smoking, and progressive-onset phenotype are associated with a delayed onset of multiple sclerosis, and marijuana use with an earlier onset, Frontiers in Neurology, 9, (JUN) Article 418. ISSN 1664-2295 (2018) [Refereed Article]


Preview
PDF
190Kb
  

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2018 Tao, Simpson, Taylor, Blizzard, Lucas, Ponsonby, Broadley, AusLong/Ausimmune Investigators Group and van der Mei.Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

DOI: doi:10.3389/fneur.2018.00418

Abstract

Background: Age at symptom onset (ASO) is a prognostic factor that could affect the accrual of disability in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Some factors are known to influence the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), but their influence on the ASO is less well-investigated.

Objective: Examine the associations between known or emerging MS risk factors and ASO.

Methods: This was a multicenter study, incident cases (n = 279) with first clinical diagnosis of demyelinating event aged 18-59 years recruited at four Australian centres (latitudes 27-43S), from 1 November 2003 to 31 December 2006. Environmental/behavioral variables and initial symptoms were recorded at baseline interview. Linear regression was used to assess the association between risk factors and ASO.

Results: Five factors were significantly associated with ASO: a history of tobacco smoking was associated with 3.05-years later ASO (p = 0.002); a history of marijuana use was associated with 6.03-years earlier ASO (p < 0.001); progressive-onset cases had 5.61-years later ASO (p = 0.001); an initial presentation of bowel & bladder and cerebral dysfunctional were associated with 3.39 (p = 0.017) and 4.37-years (p = 0.006) later ASO, respectively. Other factors, including sex, offspring number, latitude of study site, history of infectious mononucleosis, HLA-DR15 & HLA-A2 genotype, 25(OH)D levels, and ultraviolet radiation exposure were not associated with ASO. Including all five significant variables into one model explained 12% of the total variance in ASO.

Conclusion: We found a novel association between a history of tobacco smoking and later onset, whereas marijuana use was associated with earlier onset. Behavioral factors seem important drivers of MS onset timing although much of the variance remains unexplained.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:first demyelinating event, age at symptom onset, smoking, offspring number, marijuana, multiple sclerosis
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Neurosciences
Research Field:Central Nervous System
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Nervous System and Disorders
UTAS Author:Tao, C (Mr Chunrong Tao)
UTAS Author:Simpson Jr, S (Dr Steve Simpson JR)
UTAS Author:Taylor, BV (Professor Bruce Taylor)
UTAS Author:Blizzard, L (Professor Leigh Blizzard)
UTAS Author:van der Mei, I (Associate Professor Ingrid van der Mei)
ID Code:126711
Year Published:2018
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2018-06-21
Last Modified:2019-02-25
Downloads:41 View Download Statistics

Repository Staff Only: item control page