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Trend and risk factors of low birth weight and macrosomia in south China, 2005-2017: a retrospective observational study

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Rao, J and Fan, D and Wu, S and Lin, D and Zhang, H and Ye, S and Luo, X and Wang, L and Yang, J and Pang, M and Zhang, J and Xia, Q and Yang, X and Wang, W and Fu, Y and Liu, Y and Guo, X and Liu, Z, Trend and risk factors of low birth weight and macrosomia in south China, 2005-2017: a retrospective observational study, Scientific Reports, 8, (1) Article 3393. ISSN 2045-2322 (2018) [Refereed Article]


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2018 The Authors. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

DOI: doi:10.1038/s41598-018-21771-6

Abstract

The percentages of low birth weight (LBW) increased from 7.7% in 2005 to 11.3% in 2011 and declined to 8.1% in 2017. For very low birth weight (VLBW) individuals, the proportion declined -1.0% annually, from 2.5% in 2005 to 1.4% in 2017. Among moderately low birth weight (MLBW) individuals, the proportion first increased 12.8% annually, from 5.0% in 2005 to 9.3% in 2011, and then declined -3.8% annually, from 9.4% in 2011 to 7.0% in 2017. The percentages of macrosomia monotone decreased from 4.0% in 2005 to 2.5% in 2017, an annual decline of -4.0%. Multiple regression analyses showed that boys, maternal age, hypertensive disorders complicating pregnancy (HDCP), and diabetes were significant risk factors for LBW. Boys, maternal age, gestational age, HDCP, diabetes, and maternal BMI were significant risk factors for macrosomia. Although the relevant figures declined slightly in our study, it is likely that LBW and macrosomia will remain a major public health issue over the next few years in China. More research aimed at control and prevention of these risk factors for LBW and macrosomia and their detrimental outcome in the mother and perinatal child should be performed in China.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:low birth weight, macrosomia, fetal weight, fetal macrosomia
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Public Health and Health Services
Research Field:Epidemiology
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health)
Objective Field:Child Health
UTAS Author:Xia, Q (Miss Qing Xia)
ID Code:126654
Year Published:2018
Web of Science® Times Cited:7
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2018-06-20
Last Modified:2019-02-18
Downloads:62 View Download Statistics

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