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Higher taxa can be effective surrogates for species-level data in detecting changes in invertebrate assemblage structure due to disturbance: a case study using a broad range of orders

Citation

Driessen, MM and Kirkpatrick, JB, Higher taxa can be effective surrogates for species-level data in detecting changes in invertebrate assemblage structure due to disturbance: a case study using a broad range of orders, Austral Entomology pp. 1-9. ISSN 2052-174X (2017) [Refereed Article]


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DOI: doi:10.1111/aen.12315

Abstract

Cost-effective assessment tools are needed to manage the impacts of natural and human disturbances on communities. Higher taxa are widely used as surrogates for species-level identification in invertebrates; however, few studies have compared their effectiveness with species-level data for terrestrial invertebrates or assessed the mechanistic basis for their performance, and none of these studies have used a broad range of orders. Here, a terrestrial invertebrate dataset comprising 21 orders, 197 families and 751 species was used to investigate whether order- and family-level identifications were effective surrogates for species-level identification in representing patterns in assemblage structure and detecting the effects of fire. Factors potentially influencing the performance of surrogates among invertebrate orders were also investigated. Family-level identification of invertebrates in moorland sites with a wide range of fire history was found to be an effective surrogate for species-level identification. Order-level identification was also an effective surrogate, but the level of discrimination among sites was typically lower than for species- or family-level identification. Higher taxonomic surrogates performed well for invertebrate orders comprising a few species that were abundant and with a small mean and variance in the number of species per higher taxon. Use of higher taxa as surrogates for species-level identification can be a cost-effective approach to monitoring impacts of disturbance, but outcomes are influenced by taxonomic diversity and community structure.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:biodiversity assessment, buttongrass moorland, fire, higher taxon approach, taxonomic sufficiency
Research Division:Biological Sciences
Research Group:Evolutionary Biology
Research Field:Animal Systematics and Taxonomy
Objective Division:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Group:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Field:Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
Author:Driessen, MM (Mr Michael Driessen)
Author:Kirkpatrick, JB (Professor James Kirkpatrick)
ID Code:125946
Year Published:2017
Web of Science® Times Cited:3
Deposited By:Geography and Spatial Science
Deposited On:2018-05-16
Last Modified:2018-05-16
Downloads:0

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