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Informal urban greenspace: a typology and trilingual systematic review of its role for urban residents and trends in the literature

Citation

Rupprecht, CDD and Byrne, JA, Informal urban greenspace: a typology and trilingual systematic review of its role for urban residents and trends in the literature, Urban Forestry and Urban Greening, 13, (4) pp. 597-611. ISSN 1618-8667 (2014) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright 2014 the Authors. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

DOI: doi:10.1016/j.ufug.2014.09.002

Abstract

Urban greenspace is vital in fulfilling people's nature needs. Informal urban greenspace (IGS) such as vacant lots, street or railway verges and riverbanks is an often-overlooked part of the natural urban landscape. We lack a formal definition of IGS and a comprehensive review of knowledge about IGS and its role for urban residents. This paper advances a formal definition and typology of IGS that can be applied globally. Based on this definition, a total of 65 peer-reviewed papers in English (57), Japanese (7) and German (1) were reviewed. We analyzed this literature for its temporal trends, spatial patterns, studied IGS types, methods used and key authors, and summarized the individual research papers’ findings concerning IGS. Results show IGS plays an important role for urban residents, but also highlight limitations and problems in realizing IGS’ full potential. Research papers focused on perception, preferences, value and uses of IGS. Residents could distinguish between formal and informal greenspace. They preferred a medium level of human influence in IGS. The analysis of patterns in the literature reveals: a marked increase in publications in the last 20 years; a strong geographical bias towards the USA; and a lack of multi-type IGS studies including all IGS types. Publications outside of scholarly research papers also make valuable contributions to our understanding of IGS. Our results suggest IGS is emerging as an important sub-discipline of urban greening research.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:wildscape, city, recreation, wasteland, vegetation, landscape
Research Division:Built Environment and Design
Research Group:Urban and Regional Planning
Research Field:Land Use and Environmental Planning
Objective Division:Environment
Objective Group:Ecosystem Assessment and Management
Objective Field:Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Urban and Industrial Environments
Author:Byrne, JA (Professor Jason Byrne)
ID Code:125064
Year Published:2014
Web of Science® Times Cited:16
Deposited By:Geography and Spatial Science
Deposited On:2018-03-26
Last Modified:2018-04-05
Downloads:2 View Download Statistics

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