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Dietary flavonoid intake in older adults: how many days of dietary assessment are required and what is the impact of seasonality?

Citation

Kent, K and Charlton, KE and Lee, S and Mond, J and Russell, J and Mitchell, P and Flood, VM, Dietary flavonoid intake in older adults: how many days of dietary assessment are required and what is the impact of seasonality?, Nutrition Journal, 17 Article 7. ISSN 1475-2891 (2018) [Refereed Article]


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2018 The Authors. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

DOI: doi:10.1186/s12937-017-0309-7

Abstract

Background: Within- and between-person variation in nutrient intake is well established, but little is known about variability in dietary flavonoid intake, including the effect of seasonality.

Methods: Within- and between-individual variability of flavonoid intake, and intake of flavonoid subclasses was examined in older adults (n = 79; mean age 70.1 y (range: 60y-80y)), using three separate 4-day weighed food records (WFR) collected approximately 4 months apart. The effects of seasonality were also examined. Mixed-effects linear regression models were used to estimate within- and between-individual variance components for flavonoids and subclasses. The number of days of dietary assessment required for a high level of hypothetical accuracy was calculated from variance ratios.

Results: Within- and between-individual variability was high for flavonoid intake, and intake of flavonoid subclasses, with variance ratios > 1. It was calculated that six days of WFR data are required for total flavonoid intake, and between 6 and 10 days was required for flavonoid subclasses. There was no effect of seasonality for total flavonoid intake or intake of flavonoid subclasses, with the exception that flavan-3-ol and flavanone intakes which were relatively low in summer, and in summer and winter, respectively.

Conclusion: While the effects of seasonality on total flavonoid intake may be small, within- and between-individual variation associated with flavonoid intake assessment appears to be substantial across 12 days of WFR data in older adults. It is recommended that a minimum of 6 days of weighed food records are collected to minimise the impact of within- and between-individual variability on total flavonoid intake assessments in this population.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:flavonoid, dietary assessment, nutrition assessment, weighed food records, intraindividual variation, interindividual variation
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Nutrition and Dietetics
Research Field:Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Neurodegenerative Disorders Related to Ageing
Author:Kent, K (Dr Katherine Kent)
Author:Lee, S (Dr Simone Lee)
Author:Mond, J (Dr Jon Mond)
ID Code:123600
Year Published:2018
Deposited By:Centre for Rural Health
Deposited On:2018-01-15
Last Modified:2018-04-13
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