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The Maternity Care Classification System – A validated system for classifying models of care

Citation

Donnolley, N and Chambers, G and Butler-Henderson, K and Chapman, M and Sullivan, E, The Maternity Care Classification System - A validated system for classifying models of care, Women and Birth, 30 October - 2 November 2017, Adelaide, South Australia, pp. 11. ISSN 1871-5192 (2017) [Conference Extract]


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Official URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S...

DOI: doi:10.1016/j.wombi.2017.08.029

Abstract

Introduction: Evidence has shown differences in outcomes under midwife-led continuity of care models, however populationlevel studies are inhibited without a standardised system to classify models of maternity care. The Australian Department of Health funded the development of the Maternity Care Classification System (MaCCS); a world-first system to facilitate meaningful analysis of maternal and perinatal outcomes under different models of care.

Aim: An independent validation study of the MaCCS was undertaken in public maternity services in New South Wales. The study’s aims included to: – examine the variation in maternity models of care, to demonstrate the need for a classification system based on model characteristics rather than model names; and – assess the repeatability and reproducibility of the MaCCS for classifying models of care.

Methods: All public maternity services in NSW were invited to classify two models of care at their facility using the MaCCS and classify three randomly allocated case studies, the latter being repeated again 2–4 weeks later. Ethical approval was received from South Eastern Sydney Local Health District Human Research Ethics Committee.

Results: The study demonstrated significant variation in how models of care are structured. The MaCCS identified the heterogeneity within model categories including variation in characteristics known to influence outcomes. The results showed that on all available measures of validity–accuracy, reproducibility and repeatability–the MaCCS is a valid system for classifying models of maternity care based on their characteristics.

Conclusion and implications: Defining and classifying models of care accurately requires a system that recognises and accounts for the heterogeneity of models of care of the same type. The MaCCS defines models of care accurately, enabling evaluation of the influence that different models of maternity care have on outcomes for women and babies to be embedded within the healthcare system–‘the truth is out there’!

Item Details

Item Type:Conference Extract
Keywords:health, health professional workforce, e-health, Australia, clinical
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Public Health and Health Services
Research Field:Health Care Administration
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Health and Support Services
Objective Field:Evaluation of Health Outcomes
Author:Butler-Henderson, K (Dr Kerryn Butler-Henderson)
ID Code:123448
Year Published:2017
Deposited By:Tasmanian School of Business and Economics
Deposited On:2018-01-09
Last Modified:2018-01-09
Downloads:0

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