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Reduced educational outcomes persist into adolescence following mild iodine deficiency in utero, despite adequacy in childhood: 15-year follow-up of the gestational iodine cohort investigating auditory processing speed and working memory

Citation

Hynes, KL and Otahal, P and Burgess, JR and Oddy, WH and Hay, I, Reduced educational outcomes persist into adolescence following mild iodine deficiency in utero, despite adequacy in childhood: 15-year follow-up of the gestational iodine cohort investigating auditory processing speed and working memory, Nutrients, 9, (12) Article 1354. ISSN 2072-6643 (2017) [Refereed Article]


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© 2017 The Authors. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

DOI: doi:10.3390/nu9121354

Abstract

There is increasing evidence that even mild gestational iodine deficiency (GID) results in adverse neurocognitive impacts on offspring. Itís unclear, however, if these persist long-term and whether they can be ameliorated by iodine sufficiency in childhood. We followed a unique cohort (Gestational Iodine Cohort, n†=†266) where gestation occurred during a period of mild population iodine deficiency, with children subsequently growing-up in an iodine replete environment. We investigated whether associations between mild GID and reductions in literacy outcomes, observed at age 9-years, persisted into adolescence. Comparisons were made between offspring of mothers with gestational urinary iodine concentrations (UICs) ≥†150 μg/L and <†150 μg/L. Educational outcomes were measured using Australian National Assessment Program-Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) tests. Children whose mothers had UICs <†150 μg/L exhibited persistent reductions in spelling from Year 3 (10%, −41.4 points (95% Confidence Interval −65.1 to −17.6, p†=†0.001)) to Year 9 (5.6%, −31.6 (−57.0 to −6.2, p†=†0.015)) compared to children whose mothers had UICs ≥†150 μg/L. Associations remained after adjustment for biological factors, socioeconomic status and adolescent UIC. Results support the hypothesis that mild GID may impact working memory and auditory processing speed. The findings have important public health implications for management of iodine nutrition in pregnancy.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:iodine nutrition, mild iodine deficiency, gestation, childhood, adolescence, educational outcomes, literacy, working memory, auditory processing speed
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Public Health and Health Services
Research Field:Epidemiology
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health)
Objective Field:Nutrition
UTAS Author:Hynes, KL (Dr Kristen Hynes)
UTAS Author:Otahal, P (Mr Petr Otahal)
UTAS Author:Burgess, JR (Professor John Burgess)
UTAS Author:Oddy, WH (Professor Wendy Oddy)
UTAS Author:Hay, I (Professor Ian Hay)
ID Code:123062
Year Published:2017
Web of Science® Times Cited:10
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2017-12-14
Last Modified:2018-09-13
Downloads:12 View Download Statistics

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