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Hydrosilicate liquids in the system rare-metal granite–Na2O–SiO2–H2O as accumulators of ore components at high pressure and temperature

Citation

Smirnov, SZ and Thomas, VG and Kamenetsky, VS and Kozmenko, OA, Hydrosilicate liquids in the system rare-metal granite-Na2O-SiO2-H2O as accumulators of ore components at high pressure and temperature, Petrology, 25, (6) pp. 625-635. ISSN 0869-5911 (2017) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2017 Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.

DOI: doi:10.1134/S0869591117060054

Abstract

Experimental investigations in the system rare-metal granite–Na2O–SiO2–H2O with the addition of aqueous solutions containing Rb, Cs, Sn, W, Mo, and Zn at 600°C and 1.5 kbar showed that the typical elements of rare-metal granites (Li, Rb, Cs, Be, Nb, and Ta) are preferentially concentrated in hydrosilicate liquids coexisting with aqueous fluid. The same behavior is characteristic of Zn and Sn, the minerals of which are usually formed under hydrothermal conditions. In contrast, Mo and W are weakly extracted by hydrosilicate liquids and almost equally distributed between them and aqueous fluids. Liquids similar to those described in this paper are formed during the final stages of magmatic crystallization in granite and granitepegmatite systems. The formation of hydrosilicate liquids in late magmatic and postmagmatic processes will be an important factor controlling the redistribution of metal components between residual magmatic melts, minerals, and aqueous fluids and, consequently, the mobility of these components in fluid-saturated magmatic systems enriched in rare metals.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:immiscibility, granite, fluid, metal partitioning, experiment
Research Division:Earth Sciences
Research Group:Geology
Research Field:Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology
Objective Division:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Group:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Field:Expanding Knowledge in the Earth Sciences
Author:Kamenetsky, VS (Professor Vadim Kamenetsky)
ID Code:121934
Year Published:2017
Funding Support:Australian Research Council (CE0561595)
Deposited By:CODES ARC
Deposited On:2017-10-21
Last Modified:2017-11-27
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