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Bacterial causes of empyema in children, Australia, 2007-2009

Citation

Strachan, RE and Cornelius, A and Gilbert, GL and Gulliver, T and Martin, A and McDonald, T and Nixon, GM and Roseby, R and Ranganathan, S and Selvadurai, H and Smith, G and Soto-Martinez, M and Suresh, S and Teoh, L and Thapa, K and Wainwright, CE and Jaffe, A, Bacterial causes of empyema in children, Australia, 2007-2009, Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17, (10) pp. 1839-1845. ISSN 1080-6040 (2011) [Refereed Article]


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Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

DOI: doi:10.3201/eid1710.101825

Abstract

An increase in the incidence of empyema worldwide could be related to invasive pneumococcal disease caused by emergent nonvaccine replacement serotypes. To determine bacterial pathogens and pneumococcal serotypes that cause empyema in children in Australia, we conducted a 2-year study of 174 children with empyema. Blood and pleural fluid samples were cultured, and pleural fluid was tested by PCR. Thirty-two (21.0%) of 152 blood and 53 (33.1%) of 160 pleural fluid cultures were positive for bacteria; Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common organism identified. PCR identified S. pneumoniae in 74 (51.7%) and other bacteria in 19 (13.1%) of 145 pleural fluid specimens. Of 53 samples in which S. pneumoniae serotypes were identified, 2 (3.8%) had vaccine-related serotypes and 51 (96.2%) had nonvaccine serotypes; 19A (n = 20; 36.4%), 3 (n = 18; 32.7%), and 1 (n = 8; 14.5%) were the most common. High proportions of nonvaccine serotypes suggest the need to broaden vaccine coverage.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:pneumococcus vaccine
Research Division:Biological Sciences
Research Group:Biochemistry and Cell Biology
Research Field:Proteomics and Intermolecular Interactions (excl. Medical Proteomics)
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Infectious Diseases
Author:Cornelius, A (Dr Anita Cornelius)
ID Code:119339
Year Published:2011
Web of Science® Times Cited:26
Deposited By:Medicine (Discipline)
Deposited On:2017-07-31
Last Modified:2017-10-16
Downloads:1 View Download Statistics

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