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Incidence and prevalence of NMOSD in Australia and New Zealand

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Bukhari, W and Prain, KM and Waters, P and Woodhall, M and O'Gorman, CM and Clarke, L and Silvestrini, RA and Bundell, CS and Abernethy, D and Bhuta, S and Blum, S and Boggild, M and Boundy, K and Brew, BJ and Brown, M and Brownlee, WJ and Butzkueven, H and Carroll, WM and Chen, C and Coulthard, A and Dale, RC and Das, C and Dear, K and Fabis-Pedrini, MJ and Fulcher, D and Gillis, D and Hawke, S and Heard, R and Henderson, APD and Heshmat, S and Hodgkinson, S and Jimenez-Sanchez, S and Killpatrick, T and King, J and Kneebone, C and Kornberg, AJ and Lechner-Scott, J and Lin, MW and Lynch, C and Macdonell, R and Mason, DF and McCombe, PA and Pender, MP and Pereira, JA and Pollard, JD and Reddel, SW and Shaw, C and Spies, J and Stankovich, J and Sutton, I and Vucic, S and Walsh, M and Wong, RC and Yiu, EM and Barnett, MH and Kermode, AG and Marriott, MP and Parratt, JDE and Slee, M and Taylor, BV and Willoughby, E and Wilson, RJ and Vincent, A and Broadley, SA, Incidence and prevalence of NMOSD in Australia and New Zealand, Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 88 pp. 632-638. ISSN 0022-3050 (2017) [Refereed Article]


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DOI: doi:10.1136/jnnp-2016-314839

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We have undertaken a clinic-based survey of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSDs) in Australia and New Zealand to establish incidence and prevalence across the region and in populations of differing ancestry.

BACKGROUND: NMOSD is a recently defined demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). The incidence and prevalence of NMOSD in Australia and New Zealand has not been established.

METHODS: Centres managing patients with demyelinating disease of the CNS across Australia and New Zealand reported patients with clinical and laboratory features that were suspicious for NMOSD. Testing for aquaporin 4 antibodies was undertaken in all suspected cases. From this group, cases were identified who fulfilled the 2015 Wingerchuk diagnostic criteria for NMOSD. A capture-recapture methodology was used to estimate incidence and prevalence, based on additional laboratory identified cases.

RESULTS: NMOSD was confirmed in 81/170 (48%) cases referred. Capture-recapture analysis gave an adjusted incidence estimate of 0.37 (95% CI 0.35 to 0.39) per million per year and a prevalence estimate for NMOSD of 0.70 (95% CI 0.61 to 0.78) per 100 000. NMOSD was three times more common in the Asian population (1.57 (95% CI 1.15 to 1.98) per 100 000) compared with the remainder of the population (0.57 (95% CI 0.50 to 0.65) per 100 000). The latitudinal gradient evident in multiple sclerosis was not seen in NMOSD.

CONCLUSIONS: NMOSD incidence and prevalence in Australia and New Zealand are comparable with figures from other populations of largely European ancestry. We found NMOSD to be more common in the population with Asian ancestry.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:ancestry, epidemiology, incidence, neuroimmunology, prevalence
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Neurosciences
Research Field:Central Nervous System
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Nervous System and Disorders
Author:Stankovich, J (Dr Jim Stankovich)
Author:Taylor, BV (Professor Bruce Taylor)
ID Code:117463
Year Published:2017
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2017-06-15
Last Modified:2017-11-22
Downloads:0

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