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Sensory, microbiological and chemical changes in vacuum-packaged blue spotted emperor (Lethrinus sp), saddletail snapper (Lutjanus malabaricus), crimson snapper (Lutjanus erythropterus), barramundi (Lates calcarifer) and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fillets stored at 4°C

Citation

Fuentes-Amaya, LF and Munyard, S and Fernandez-Piquer, J and Howieson, J, Sensory, microbiological and chemical changes in vacuum-packaged blue spotted emperor (Lethrinus sp), saddletail snapper (Lutjanus malabaricus), crimson snapper (Lutjanus erythropterus), barramundi (Lates calcarifer) and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fillets stored at 4°C, Food Science & Nutrition, 4, (3) pp. 479-489. ISSN 2048-7177 (2016) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright 2015 The Authors. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

DOI: doi:10.1002/fsn3.309

Abstract

Quality assessment of finfish fillets during storage is important to be able to predict the shelf life of the fresh product during distribution. Microbial, chemical (pH, TMA, and TVB-N), and sensory (Quality index assessment QIA, Torry scheme) changes in vacuum-packaged blue-spotted emperor (Lethrinus sp), saddletail (Lutjanus malabaricus), crimson snapper (Lutjanus erythropterus), barramundi (Lates calcarifer), and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fillets stored at 4C were evaluated for 5days. Microbiological study included evaluation of TVC (total viable counts), total psychrotrophic organisms, and H2S-producing bacteria. Numbers increased during storage time and reached an average of 8.5, 8.5, and 9.2 log10cfu/g, respectively, for the five different fish species. These levels were above accepted microbiological limits for fish fillets. Although the sensory analyses showed a decrease in quality, none of the finfish fillets were considered unacceptable at the end of the storage trial. Chemically, there was a slight pH increase, but trimethylamine (TMA) levels remained low. However, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) levels increased over time, reaching levels above 35mg/100g for blue spotted emperor, saddletail snapper, and crimson snapper by the end of the storage period. Results show that the deterioration of finfish fillet quality is a complex event of biochemical, sensory, and microbial factors, and multiple analyses may be required to define acceptability.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:finfish, quality assessment, specific spoilage organisms, spoilage, total viable count
Research Division:Biological Sciences
Research Group:Microbiology
Research Field:Microbiology not elsewhere classified
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health)
Objective Field:Food Safety
Author:Fernandez-Piquer, J (Dr Judith Fernandez-Piquer)
ID Code:117144
Year Published:2016
Deposited By:Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture
Deposited On:2017-06-01
Last Modified:2017-09-04
Downloads:4 View Download Statistics

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