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Five decades on: use of historical weaning size data reveals that a decrease in maternal foraging success underpins the long-term decline in population of southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina)

Citation

Clausius, E and McMahon, CR and Hindell, MA, Five decades on: use of historical weaning size data reveals that a decrease in maternal foraging success underpins the long-term decline in population of southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina), PLoS One, 12, (3) Article e0173427. ISSN 1932-6203 (2017) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

Copyright: © 2017 Clausius et al. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

DOI: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0173427

Abstract

The body of work quantifying the effects of climate change on animal populations has grown rapidly, and encompasses most, if not all, major taxonomic groups across all the World’s oceans and continents. This work is only made possible by long-term datasets covering a range of both environmental and biological conditions. Thus, for species or regions in which the collection of long-term and continuous data is difficult, identifying the relationships between environmental change and changes in the dynamics and demographics of populations can be especially challenging. In the remote Antarctic and Southern Ocean adverse conditions hamper the collection of long-term biological data. As such, information on the size and trends of animal populations in the region is rare, with little to no information available prior to the 1950s, and only very scarce information available prior to the mid-1970s.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:elephant seals, climate change, weaning size
Research Division:Biological Sciences
Research Group:Ecology
Research Field:Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)
Objective Division:Environment
Objective Group:Ecosystem Assessment and Management
Objective Field:Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic Environments
Author:Clausius, E (Miss Ella Clausius)
Author:Hindell, MA (Professor Mark Hindell)
ID Code:117139
Year Published:2017
Deposited By:Ecology and Biodiversity
Deposited On:2017-06-01
Last Modified:2017-12-06
Downloads:21 View Download Statistics

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