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Left-right compatibility in the processing of trading verbs

Citation

Vicario, CM and Rumiati, RI, Left-right compatibility in the processing of trading verbs, Frontiers in behavioral neuroscience, 8 Article 16. ISSN 1662-5153 (2014) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

Copyright 2014 The Author(s) Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

DOI: doi:10.3389/fnbeh.2014.00016

Abstract

The research investigating the nature of cognitive processes involved in the representation of economical outcomes is growing. Within this research, the mental accounting model proposes that individuals may well use cognitive operations to organize, evaluate, and keep track of their financial activities (Thaler, 1999). Here we wanted to test this hypothesis by asking to a group of participants to detect a syntax mistake of verbs indicating incoming and going out activities related to economical profit (trading verbs), swapping (swapping verbs) and thinking (thinking verbs). We reported a left-right compatibility for trading verbs (i.e., participants were faster with their right hand while detecting verb referring to a monetary gain with respect to a monetary loss; and faster with their left hand while detecting a monetary loss with respect to a monetary gain). However, this pattern of result was not reported while detecting swapping verbs. Results are discussed taking into account the mental accounting theory as well as to the spatial mapping of valence hypothesis.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:language, economics, SNARC effect, mental accounting theory, spatial valence hypothesis
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Neurosciences
Research Field:Neurosciences not elsewhere classified
Objective Division:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Group:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Field:Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Author:Vicario, CM (Dr Carmelo Vicario)
ID Code:115995
Year Published:2014
Web of Science® Times Cited:2
Deposited By:Psychology
Deposited On:2017-04-26
Last Modified:2017-11-06
Downloads:3 View Download Statistics

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