eCite Digital Repository

An adverse lipid profile and increased levels of adiposity significantly predict clinical course after a first demyelinating event

Citation

Tettey, P and Simpson, S and Taylor, B and Ponsonby, A-L and Lucas, RM and Dwyer, T and Kostner, K and van der Mei, IAF, An adverse lipid profile and increased levels of adiposity significantly predict clinical course after a first demyelinating event, Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 88 pp. 395-401. ISSN 0022-3050 (2017) [Refereed Article]


Preview
PDF (final published version)
Pending copyright assessment - Request a copy
483Kb
  

Copyright Statement

Copyright Article author (or their employer) 2017

DOI: doi:10.1136/jnnp-2016-315037

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prospective associations between adiposity and lipid-related variables and conversion to multiple sclerosis (MS), time to subsequent relapse and progression in disability.

METHODS: A cohort of 279 participants with a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination was prospectively followed to 5-year review. Height, weight, waist and hip circumference were measured, and serum samples taken for measurement of lipids and apolipoproteins. Survival analysis was used for conversion to MS and time to relapse, and linear regression for annualised change in disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale).

RESULTS: Higher body mass index (BMI; adjusted HR (aHR): 1.22 (1.04 to 1.44) per 5 kg/m2 increase), hip circumference (aHR: 1.32 (1.12 to 1.56) per 10 cm increase) and triglyceride levels (aHR: 1.20 (1.03 to 1.40) per unit increase) were associated with increased risk of subsequent relapse, while adiposity and lipid-related measures were not associated with conversion to MS. In addition, higher BMI (β: 0.04 (0.01 to 0.07) per 5 kg/m2 increase), hip circumference (β: 0.04 (0.02 to 0.08) per 10 cm increase), waist circumference (β: 0.04 (0.02 to 0.07) per 10 cm increase), total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein ratio (TC/HDL ratio; β: 0.05 (0.001 to 0.10) and non-HDL; β: 0.04 (0.001 to 0.08) at study entry) were associated with a higher subsequent annual change in disability.

CONCLUSIONS: Higher levels of adiposity, non-HDL and TC/HDL ratio were prospectively associated with a higher rate of disability progression, and higher adiposity and triglycerides were associated with relapse but not with conversion to MS. Improving the lipid profile and losing weight into the healthy range could reduce the accumulation of disability.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Neurosciences
Research Field:Central Nervous System
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Nervous System and Disorders
Author:Tettey, P (Mr Prudence Tettey)
Author:Simpson, S (Dr Steve Simpson JR)
Author:Taylor, B (Professor Bruce Taylor)
Author:van der Mei, IAF (Associate Professor Ingrid van der Mei)
ID Code:115496
Year Published:2017
Web of Science® Times Cited:2
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2017-03-28
Last Modified:2017-11-21
Downloads:0

Repository Staff Only: item control page