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Mid-life environmental enrichment increases synaptic density in CA1 in a mouse model of Aβ-associated pathology and positively influences synaptic and cognitive health in healthy ageing

Citation

Stuart, KE and King, AE and Fernandez-Martos, CM and Dittmann, J and Summers, MJ and Vickers, JC, Mid-life environmental enrichment increases synaptic density in CA1 in a mouse model of Aβ-associated pathology and positively influences synaptic and cognitive health in healthy ageing, Journal of Comparative Neurology, 525, (8) pp. 1797-1810. ISSN 0021-9967 (2017) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright Statement

Copyright 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cne.24156. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

DOI: doi:10.1002/cne.24156

Abstract

Early-life cognitive enrichment may reduce the risk of experiencing cognitive deterioration and dementia in later-life. However, an intervention to prevent or delay dementia is likely to be taken up in mid to later-life. Hence, we investigated the effects of environmental enrichment in wildtype mice and in a mouse model of Aβ neuropathology (APPSWE/PS1dE9) from 6 months of age. After 6 months of housing in standard laboratory cages, APPSWE/PS1dE9 (n = 27) and healthy wildtype (n = 21) mice were randomly assigned to either enriched or standard housing. At 12 months of age, wildtype mice showed altered synaptic protein levels and relatively superior cognitive performance afforded by environmental enrichment. Environmental enrichment was not associated with alterations to Aβ plaque pathology in the neocortex or hippocampus of APPSWE/PS1dE9 mice. However, a significant increase in synaptophysin immunolabeled puncta in the hippocampal subregion, CA1, in APPSWE/PS1dE9 mice was detected, with no significant synaptic density changes observed in CA3, or the Fr2 region of the prefrontal cortex. Moreover, a significant increase in hippocampal BDNF was detected in APPSWE/PS1dE9 mice exposed to EE, however, no changes were detected in neocortex or between Wt animals. These results demonstrate that mid to later-life cognitive enrichment has the potential to promote synaptic and cognitive health in ageing, and to enhance compensatory capacity for synaptic connectivity in pathological ageing associated with Aβ deposition.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:Alzheimer's disease, environmental enrichment, transgenic mouse, BDNF, cognitive function
Research Division:Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Research Group:Psychology
Research Field:Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Nervous System and Disorders
Author:Stuart, KE (Miss Kimberley Stuart)
Author:King, AE (Associate Professor Anna King)
Author:Fernandez-Martos, CM (Dr Carmen Fernandez-Martos)
Author:Dittmann, J (Mr Justin Dittmann)
Author:Summers, MJ (Dr Mathew Summers)
Author:Vickers, JC (Professor James Vickers)
ID Code:114217
Year Published:2017 (online first 2016)
Web of Science® Times Cited:3
Deposited By:Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre
Deposited On:2017-02-08
Last Modified:2017-11-06
Downloads:0

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