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Who benefits? What benefits? Part-time postgraduate study in health and human services

Citation

Shannon, EA and Pearson, S and Quinn, W and Macintyre, K, Who benefits? What benefits? Part-time postgraduate study in health and human services, International Journal of Lifelong Education pp. 1-21. ISSN 0260-1370 (2016) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

DOI: doi:10.1080/02601370.2016.1265600

Abstract

Part-time postgraduate students make up a significant proportion of the student population, yet their experience remains poorly understood. In this article, a multi-phase, explanatory mixedmethod study conducted within Tasmanian health and human services provides some answers. Students reported improved job performance, self-esteem and increased motivation to learn as primary outcomes. Other benefits of significance included an increased ability to manage change and increased job satisfaction. At the other end of the scale, fewer than half of all respondents agreed that part-time postgraduate study led to increased pay or remuneration, and only one-quarter of respondents believed their study led to improvements in personal relationships. There were significant associations between organisational placement and perceptions of benefit. The managers of those who were studying were less likely to perceive either increased job satisfaction or improved job performance in their subordinates. Amongst postgraduate, mature-age, part-time student respondents, their prior experience in higher education, professional background, seniority in the organisation, age and gender were also associated with differing perceptions of the benefits of higher education. These results add to the body of knowledge around the human, social and identity capital benefits associated with lifelong learning, and this study provides guidance for students, employers and universities.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:health and human services, human capital, identity capital, social capital
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Public Health and Health Services
Research Field:Health Care Administration
Objective Division:Education and Training
Objective Group:Learner and Learning
Objective Field:Learner and Learning Achievement
Author:Shannon, EA (Dr Elizabeth Shannon)
Author:Pearson, S (Dr Sue Pearson)
Author:Quinn, W (Mrs Wendy Quinn)
Author:Macintyre, K (Dr Kate Macintyre)
ID Code:113178
Year Published:2016
Deposited By:Medicine (Discipline)
Deposited On:2016-12-15
Last Modified:2017-04-21
Downloads:0

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