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Poor self-recognition of disordered eating among girls with bulimic-type eating disorders: cause for concern?

Citation

Gratwick-Sarll, K and Bentley, C and Harrison, C and Mond, J, Poor self-recognition of disordered eating among girls with bulimic-type eating disorders: cause for concern?, Early intervention in psychiatry, 10, (4) pp. 316-23. ISSN 1751-7885 (2016) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

DOI: doi:10.1111/eip.12168

Abstract

AIM: Bulimic-type eating disorders are common among young women and associated with high levels of distress and disability and low uptake of mental health care. We examined self-recognition of disordered eating and factors associated with this among female adolescents with bulimic-type eating disorders (n = 139) recruited from a large, population-based sample.

METHODS: A vignette of a fictional character with bulimia nervosa was presented, followed by a series of questions addressing the nature and treatment of the problem described. One of these questions required participants to indicate whether they currently had a problem such as the one described. Self-report measures of eating disorder symptoms, general psychological distress and quality of life were also completed.

RESULTS: More than half of participants (58%) did not believe that they currently had a problem with their eating. In multivariable analysis, impairment in emotional well-being and self-induced vomiting were the only variables independently associated with self-recognition. Participants who recognized a problem with their eating were more likely to have sought treatment for an eating problem than those who did not.

CONCLUSIONS: Recognition of disordered eating among adolescents with bulimic-type eating disorders may be poor and this may be a factor in low uptake of mental health care. Health promotion efforts may need to address the misconception that only bulimic-type disorders involving self-induced vomiting are pathological.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:binge eating disorder, bulimia nervosa, eating disorders, mental health literacy, self-recognition.
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Public Health and Health Services
Research Field:Mental Health
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health)
Objective Field:Mental Health
Author:Mond, J (Dr Jon Mond)
ID Code:111944
Year Published:2016
Web of Science® Times Cited:2
Deposited By:Centre for Rural Health
Deposited On:2016-10-17
Last Modified:2017-11-03
Downloads:0

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