eCite Digital Repository

Antarctic isolation: Immune and viral studies

Citation

Tingate, TR and Lugg, DJ and Muller, HK and Stowe, RP and Pierson, DL, Antarctic isolation: Immune and viral studies, Immunology and Cell Biology, 75, (3) pp. 275-283. ISSN 0818-9641 (1997) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1038/icb.1997.42

Abstract

Stressful environmental conditions are a major determinant of immune reactivity. This effect is pronounced in Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition populations exposed to prolonged periods of isolation in the Antarctic. Alterations of T cell function, including depression of cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity responses and a peak 48.9% reduction of T cell proliferation to the mitogen phytohaemagglutinin, were documented during a 9-month period of isolation. T cell dysfunction was mediated by changes within the peripheral blood mononuclear cell compartment, including a paradoxical atypical monocytosis associated with altered production of inflammatory cytokines. There was a striking reduction in the production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the predominant pro-inflammatory monokine TNF-α and changes were also detected in the production of IL-1, IL- 2, IL-6, IL-1ra and IL-10. Prolonged Antarctic isolation is also associated with altered latent herpesvirus homeostasis, including increased herpesvirus shedding and expansion of the polyclonal latent Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cell population. These findings have important long-term health implications.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Immunology
Research Field:Cellular Immunology
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Other Health
Objective Field:Health not elsewhere classified
Author:Muller, HK (Professor Konrad Muller)
ID Code:10961
Year Published:1997
Web of Science® Times Cited:43
Deposited By:Pathology
Deposited On:1997-08-01
Last Modified:2011-08-11
Downloads:0

Repository Staff Only: item control page