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Influence of posture and frequency modes in total body water estimation using bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy in boys and adult males

Citation

Kagawa, M and Wishart, C and Hills, AP, Influence of posture and frequency modes in total body water estimation using bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy in boys and adult males, Nutrients, 6, (5) pp. 1886-1898. ISSN 2072-6643 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.3390/nu6051886

Abstract

The aim of the study was to examine differences in total body water (TBW) measured using single-frequency (SF) and multi-frequency (MF) modes of bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS) in children and adults measured in different postures using the deuterium (2H) dilution technique as the reference. Twenty-three boys and 26 adult males underwent assessment of TBW using the dilution technique and BIS measured in supine and standing positions using two frequencies of the SF mode (50 kHz and 100 kHz) and the MF mode. While TBW estimated from the MF mode was comparable, extra-cellular fluid (ECF) and intra-cellular fluid (ICF) values differed significantly (p < 0.01) between the different postures in both groups. In addition, while estimated TBW in adult males using the MF mode was significantly (p < 0.01) greater than the result from the dilution technique, TBW estimated using the SF mode and prediction equation was significantly (p < 0.01) lower in boys. Measurement posture may not affect estimation of TBW in boys and adult males, however, body fluid shifts may still occur. In addition, technical factors, including selection of prediction equation, may be important when TBW is estimated from measured impedance.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Medical Physiology
Research Field:Human Biophysics
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health)
Objective Field:Men's Health
Author:Hills, AP (Professor Andrew Hills)
ID Code:109233
Year Published:2014
Web of Science® Times Cited:2
Deposited By:Health Sciences
Deposited On:2016-06-03
Last Modified:2017-11-06
Downloads:0

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