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Adiposity is related to decrements in cardiorespiratory fitness in obese and normal-weight children

Citation

Tsiros, MD and Coates, AM and Howe, PRC and Walkley, J and Hills, AP and Wood, RE and Buckley, JD, Adiposity is related to decrements in cardiorespiratory fitness in obese and normal-weight children, Pediatric obesity, 11, (2) pp. 144-50. ISSN 2047-6302 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1111/ijpo.12037

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Obese children are typically less physically active than their normal-weight peers and are often assumed to be 'unfit'.

OBJECTIVE: Investigate the relationships between adiposity, physical activity levels and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) in obese and normal-weight children. A secondary aim was to examine obese/normal-weight differences in CRF.

METHODS: Obese (N = 107) and normal-weight (N = 132) 10-13-year-olds participated. Fat-free mass (FFM), percent fat, physical activity and peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak ) were assessed. Analyses were adjusted for socioeconomic status (SES).

RESULTS: Higher percent fat was inversely associated with VO2peak normalized for mass (r = -0.780, P < 0.001) even after controlling for physical activity (r = -0.673, P < 0.001). While higher percent fat was also inversely associated with VO2peak normalized for FFM, this was only significant in males (r = -0.247, P = 0.004) and did not persist after controlling for physical activity (r = -0.059 P = 0.526). Compared with normal-weight children, obese children had higher absolute VO2peak , lower VO2peak corrected for mass (P ≤ 0.009) and lower VO2peak corrected for FFM (P = 0.041) that did not persist after controlling for SES (P = 0.086).

CONCLUSION: Obesity-related inefficiencies in CRF were evident. Higher adiposity was associated with poorer CRF relative to mass, irrespective of physical activity levels. However, low physical activity levels may be responsible for associations between adiposity and CRF relative to FFM seen in boys, indicating the importance of encouraging physical activity.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:Body mass index; child; cycle ergometry; peak oxygen uptake
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Public Health and Health Services
Research Field:Community Child Health
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health)
Objective Field:Child Health
Author:Hills, AP (Professor Andrew Hills)
ID Code:109140
Year Published:2016
Web of Science® Times Cited:1
Deposited By:Health Sciences
Deposited On:2016-05-27
Last Modified:2016-08-12
Downloads:0

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