eCite Digital Repository

Cyst and radionucleotide evidence for the recent introduction of the toxic dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum into Tasmanian waters

Citation

McMinn, A and Hallegraeff, GM and Thomson, PG and Jenkinson, AV and Heijnis, H, Cyst and radionucleotide evidence for the recent introduction of the toxic dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum into Tasmanian waters, Marine Ecology Progress Series, 161 pp. 165-172. ISSN 0171-8630 (1997) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.3354/meps161165

Abstract

Cysts of the dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum were present only in the top sections of duplicate marine sediment cores from Deep Bay in southern Tasmania, Australia. 210 Pb and 137 Cs analyses indicate that the appearance of the cyst of this toxic dinoflagellate (one of the causative organisms of paralytic shellfish poisoning) occurred after 1972. This sediment core evidence and the absence of this species from the phytoplankton of most other neighbouring Australian waters suggest that Gymnodinium catenatum is not endemic to Tasmania but has been introduced recently. This species was first seen in bloom proportions in Tasmania in 1980, with major blooms having occurred since then in 1986, 1991 and 1993. Several lines of evidence suggest that ballast water discharge from cargo vessels originating from Japan and South Korea, or less likely Europe, is the most probable mechanism of introduction.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Biological Sciences
Research Group:Ecology
Research Field:Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)
Objective Division:Environment
Objective Group:Other Environment
Objective Field:Marine Oceanic Processes (excl. climate related)
Author:McMinn, A (Professor Andrew McMinn)
Author:Hallegraeff, GM (Professor Gustaaf Hallegraeff)
Author:Thomson, PG (Mr Paul Thomson)
ID Code:10901
Year Published:1997
Web of Science® Times Cited:54
Deposited By:IASOS
Deposited On:1997-08-01
Last Modified:2011-08-11
Downloads:0

Repository Staff Only: item control page