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Associations of maternal prepregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain with cardio-metabolic risk factors in adolescent offspring: a prospective cohort study

Citation

Gaillard, R and Welten, M and Oddy, WH and Beilin, LJ and Mori, TA and Jaddoe, VWV and Huang, R-C, Associations of maternal prepregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain with cardio-metabolic risk factors in adolescent offspring: a prospective cohort study, BJOG, 123, (2) pp. 207-216. ISSN 1470-0328 (2016) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

DOI: doi:10.1111/1471-0528.13700

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To assess the associations of maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and rates of early-pregnancy, mid-pregnancy and total gestational weight gain with adolescent body fat distribution and cardio-metabolic outcomes.

DESIGN: Population-based prospective cohort study.

SETTING: Western Australia.

POPULATION: Thousand three hundred and ninety-two mothers and their children.

METHODS: Maternal prepregnancy weight was assessed by questionnaire. Maternal weights at a mean of 16.5 2.2 SD and 34.1 1.5 SD weeks of gestation were obtained from medical records. Offspring adiposity and cardio-metabolic outcomes were assessed at a median age 17.0 years [95% confidence interval (CI) range: 16.7, 17.7].

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Adolescent BMI, waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), blood pressure, total and HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, glucose and HOMA-IR.

RESULTS: Higher prepregnancy BMI was associated with higher adolescent BMI, WC, WHR, systolic blood pressure, insulin, glucose and HOMA-IR levels (P-values <0.05). Adjustment for adolescent current BMI attenuated the associations of prepregnancy BMI with adolescent cardio-metabolic outcomes. Higher weight gain in early-pregnancy, but not mid-pregnancy, was associated with higher adolescent BMI, WC and WHR (P-values <0.05), but not with other cardio-metabolic risk factors. Total gestational weight gain was associated with adolescent BMI and WC (P-values <0.05). Higher prepregnancy BMI and early-pregnancy weight gain were associated with increased risks of the high-metabolic risk cluster in adolescents (OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.33, 1.85 and OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.03, 1.47 per SD increase in prepregnancy BMI and early-pregnancy weight gain, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS: Higher maternal prepregnancy BMI and early-pregnancy weight gain rate are associated with an adverse adolescent cardio-metabolic profile. These associations are largely mediated by adolescent BMI.

TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: Prepregnancy BMI and early-pregnancy WG rate are associated with adverse adolescent cardio-metabolic profile.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:Adiposity, adolescence, blood pressure, cohort study, gestational weight gain, insulin/glucose, lipids, maternal body mass index, pregnancy
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Nutrition and Dietetics
Research Field:Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health)
Objective Field:Nutrition
Author:Oddy, WH (Professor Wendy Oddy)
ID Code:107409
Year Published:2016
Web of Science® Times Cited:12
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2016-03-15
Last Modified:2017-11-06
Downloads:0

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