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Unnecessary and disproportionate: the outcomes of remand for indigenous young people according to service providers

Citation

Mathieson, B and Dwyer, A, Unnecessary and disproportionate: the outcomes of remand for indigenous young people according to service providers, Journal of Children's Services, 11, (2) pp. 141-156. ISSN 1746-6660 (2016) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

© Emerald Group Publishing Limited 2016

DOI: doi:10.1108/JCS-04-2015-0016

Abstract

Purpose: While research often elaborates on outcomes of youth remand more broadly, the specific impact that remand has on indigenous young people can be overlooked, particularly in Australia. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach: This paper analyses interview data gathered from eight individual service providers from six community youth organisations in a city in Queensland, Australia.

Findings: Participants reported the specific effects of remand for indigenous young people and their families, noting especially the negative impact on the young people’s emotional, social and psychological development.

Originality/value: Results strongly suggest there is a blurring of the welfare and justice systems inherent within remand processes with indigenous young people, with remand employed so frequently that it has itself become a form of social support.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:indigenous, young people, welfare, criminal justice, remand
Research Division:Studies in Human Society
Research Group:Criminology
Research Field:Criminology not elsewhere classified
Objective Division:Law, Politics and Community Services
Objective Group:Justice and the Law
Objective Field:Law Enforcement
Author:Dwyer, A (Dr Angela Dwyer)
ID Code:105686
Year Published:2016
Deposited By:Social Sciences
Deposited On:2016-01-13
Last Modified:2017-10-27
Downloads:0

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