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Analytical bias in the measurement of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations impairs assessment of vitamin D Status in clinical and research settings

Citation

Black, LJ and Anderson, D and Clarke, MW and Ponsonby, A-L and Lucas, RM and Taylor, B and van der Mei, I, Ausimmune Investigator Group, Analytical bias in the measurement of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations impairs assessment of vitamin D Status in clinical and research settings, PL o S One, 10, (8) Article e0135478. ISSN 1932-6203 (2015) [Refereed Article]


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Copyright: 2015 Black et al. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

DOI: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0135478

Abstract

Measured serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations vary depending on the type of assay used and the specific laboratory undertaking the analysis, impairing the accurate assessment of vitamin D status. We investigated differences in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations measured at three laboratories (laboratories A and B using an assay based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and laboratory C using a DiaSorin Liaison assay), against a laboratory using an assay based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry that is certified to the standard reference method developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology and Ghent University (referred to as the 'certified laboratory'). Separate aliquots from the same original serum sample for a subset of 50 participants from the Ausimmune Study were analysed at the four laboratories. Bland-Altman plots were used to visually check agreement between each laboratory against the certified laboratory. Compared with the certified laboratory, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations were on average 12.4 nmol/L higher at laboratory A (95% limits of agreement: -17.8,42.6); 12.8 nmol/L higher at laboratory B (95% limits of agreement: 0.8,24.8); and 10.6 nmol/L lower at laboratory C (95% limits of agreement: -48.4,27.1). The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (defined here as 25-hydroxyvitamin D < 50 nmol/L) was 24%, 16%, 12% and 41% at the certified laboratory, and laboratories A, B, and C, respectively. Our results demonstrate considerable differences in the measurement of 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations compared with a certified laboratory, even between laboratories using assays based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, which is often considered the gold-standard assay. To ensure accurate and reliable measurement of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, all laboratories should use an accuracy-based quality assurance system and, ideally, comply with international standardisation efforts

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Neurosciences
Research Field:Central Nervous System
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions)
Objective Field:Nervous System and Disorders
UTAS Author:Taylor, B (Professor Bruce Taylor)
UTAS Author:van der Mei, I (Associate Professor Ingrid van der Mei)
ID Code:103557
Year Published:2015
Web of Science® Times Cited:27
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2015-10-15
Last Modified:2017-11-06
Downloads:212 View Download Statistics

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