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Evidence of Pleistocene plant extinction and diversity from Regatta Point, Western Tasmania, Australia

Citation

Jordan, GJ, Evidence of Pleistocene plant extinction and diversity from Regatta Point, Western Tasmania, Australia, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 123, (1) pp. 45-71. ISSN 0024-4066 (1997) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1006/bojl.1996.0072

Abstract

The Early Pleistocene Regatta Point sediments contain macrofossils that suggest that generic and specific rainforest diversity was higher in the region that it is today both locally an regionally, but the diversity was probably lower than it was for most of the Tertiary. The sediments contain extinct species of conifers and angiosperms which have closest living relatives in a wide range of environments, mainly wet forests of warmer areas than western Tasmania, but also relatively cool and dry areas. Simple models of climatically driven extinction explain these extinctions poorly. It is more likely that there was a wide range of causes of extinctions. New species, Acacia bulbosa, Rubus nebuloides, Quintinia tasmanensis, Oxylobium pungens, Laurophyllum australum and Myrtaceaephyllum pleistocenicum, are described.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Biological Sciences
Research Group:Plant Biology
Research Field:Phycology (incl. Marine Grasses)
Objective Division:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Group:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Field:Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
Author:Jordan, GJ (Associate Professor Greg Jordan)
ID Code:10344
Year Published:1997
Web of Science® Times Cited:41
Deposited By:Plant Science
Deposited On:1997-08-01
Last Modified:2011-08-11
Downloads:0

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