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A synthesis of tagging studies examining the behaviour and survival of anadromous salmonids in marine environments

Citation

Drenner, SM and Clark, TD and Whitney, CK and Martins, EG and Cooke, SJ and Hinch, SG, A synthesis of tagging studies examining the behaviour and survival of anadromous salmonids in marine environments, PLoS ONE, 7, (3) Article e31311. ISSN 1932-6203 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0031311

Abstract

This paper synthesizes tagging studies to highlight the current state of knowledge concerning the behaviour and survival of anadromous salmonids in the marine environment. Scientific literature was reviewed to quantify the number and type of studies that have investigated behaviour and survival of anadromous forms of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), brown trout (Salmo trutta), steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii). We examined three categories of tags including electronic (e.g. acoustic, radio, archival), passive (e.g. external marks, Carlin, coded wire, passive integrated transponder [PIT]), and biological (e.g. otolith, genetic, scale, parasites). Based on 207 papers, survival rates and behaviour in marine environments were found to be extremely variable spatially and temporally, with some of the most influential factors being temperature, population, physiological state, and fish size. Salmonids at all life stages were consistently found to swim at an average speed of approximately one body length per second, which likely corresponds with the speed at which transport costs are minimal. We found that there is relatively little research conducted on open-ocean migrating salmonids, and some species (e.g. masu [O. masou] and amago [O. rhodurus]) are underrepresented in the literature. The most common forms of tagging used across life stages were various forms of external tags, coded wire tags, and acoustic tags, however, the majority of studies did not measure tagging/handling effects on the fish, tag loss/failure, or tag detection probabilities when estimating survival. Through the interdisciplinary application of existing and novel technologies, future research examining the behaviour and survival of anadromous salmonids could incorporate important drivers such as oceanography, tagging/handling effects, predation, and physiology.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Biological Sciences
Research Group:Zoology
Research Field:Animal Behaviour
Objective Division:Environment
Objective Group:Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
Objective Field:Coastal and Estuarine Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
UTAS Author:Clark, TD (Dr Timothy Clark)
ID Code:103383
Year Published:2012
Web of Science® Times Cited:70
Deposited By:IMAS Research and Education Centre
Deposited On:2015-10-07
Last Modified:2018-04-11
Downloads:0

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