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The phenologies of Cotesia urabae, Dolichogenidea eucalypti (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) and their host Uraba lugens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in the Adelaide region

Citation

Allen, GR, The phenologies of Cotesia urabae, Dolichogenidea eucalypti (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) and their host Uraba lugens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in the Adelaide region, Australian Journal of Zoology, 38, (4) pp. 347-362. ISSN 0004-959X (1990) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 1990 CSIRO

DOI: doi:10.1071/ZO9900347

Abstract

A field study was undertaken to determine the phenologies of the solitary larval endoparasitoids Cotesia urabae and Dolichogenidea eucalypti in relation to that of their bivoltine host Uraba lugens. C. urabae had two generations within both the summer and the winter generation of U. lugens, and D. eucalypti had two generations in the summer but only one generation in the winter. D. eucalypti parasitised a narrower range of host sizes in the field. Both parasitoids attacked recently hatched (typically 1st instar) or 'small hosts' at the beginning at each host generation. In summer D. eucalypti was the first to emerge from hosts, but both D. eucalypti and C. urabae, emerged from hosts which had modes of 0.85-1.05 mm in head capsule width and 0.9-1.5 mg in dry weight (mid hosts). In winter, C. urabae emerged from hosts which had modes of 1.15 mm in head capsule width and 2.7 mg in dry weight (large hosts). Both species in summer, and C. urabae in winter, then proceeded to parasitise hosts of around these sizes to commence second parasitoid generations. In its second generation in summer and its first generation in winter, D. eucalypti typically emerged after most unparasitised hosts had pupated. Both species of parasitoid overwintered within the larval stage of their host. Levels of parasitisation appeared to be low, and dropped between first and second generations within each host generation. It was concluded that C. urabae and D. eucalypti displayed continuity of generations and a high level of synchronisation with U. lugens in the Adelaide region.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
Research Group:Forestry Sciences
Research Field:Forestry Pests, Health and Diseases
Objective Division:Environment
Objective Group:Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species
Objective Field:Control of Plant Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species in Forest and Woodlands Environments
Author:Allen, GR (Associate Professor Geoff Allen)
ID Code:102689
Year Published:1990
Web of Science® Times Cited:7
Deposited By:Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture
Deposited On:2015-09-03
Last Modified:2015-10-06
Downloads:0

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