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Strategic early treatment for control of sheep flystrike: potential economic benefits examined using a weather-driven model of flystrike risk

Citation

Horton, BJ, Strategic early treatment for control of sheep flystrike: potential economic benefits examined using a weather-driven model of flystrike risk, Animal Production Science, 55, (9) pp. 1131-1144. ISSN 1836-0939 (2015) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

 CSIRO 2015

DOI: doi:10.1071/AN14509

Abstract

The application of preventive treatment against flystrike early in spring (before strike occurs) may reduce the reproductive success of the sheep blowfly, thereby maintaining a low risk of flystrike throughout the fly season. This hypothesis has been examined using a weather-driven model of flystrike (incorporating a reduced risk due to early treatment), based on previous experimental studies. The model indicates that in the Gunning area (with a high flystrike risk), this reduction in seasonal risk would reduce total costs related to flystrike, reduce the overall use of preventive chemical treatment and reduce the number of sheep struck. However, in a lower risk area (Flinders Island), the value of early treatment would depend on the date of shearing and the local risk of flystrike. Under some conditions, no preventive treatment would be necessary in most years because of a regional low risk of flystrike, so there would be no economic benefit from always using early treatment. Early treatment is least likely to be cost-effective when shearing is required soon after the optimal date for early treatment. Further experimental studies are recommended to fully examine whether the previously reported reduction in flystrike resulting from early treatment is consistent over a wider range of climatic conditions.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:sheep, flystrike treatment, body strike, breech strike, modelling disease, mulesing, sheep blowfly
Research Division:Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
Research Group:Animal Production
Research Field:Animal Protection (Pests and Pathogens)
Objective Division:Animal Production and Animal Primary Products
Objective Group:Livestock Raising
Objective Field:Sheep - Wool
Author:Horton, BJ (Dr Brian Horton)
ID Code:102523
Year Published:2015
Deposited By:Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture
Deposited On:2015-08-26
Last Modified:2017-11-07
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