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Social smoking among intermittent smokers

Citation

Shiffman, S and Li, X and Dunbar, MS and Ferguson, SG and Tindle, HA and Scholl, SM, Social smoking among intermittent smokers, Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 154 pp. 184-191. ISSN 0376-8716 (2015) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

DOI: doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2015.06.027

Abstract

Background: "Social smoking" smoking mostly or even only with others may be an important pattern that implies smoking motivated extrinsically by social influences. Non-daily smokers (intermittent smokers; ITS) are often assumed to be social smokers, with some authors even assuming that all ITS are social smokers (SS+). We sought to identify and characterize social smokers in a sample of ITS.

Methods: 204 adult ITS (smoking 427 days/month) recorded the circumstances of smoking in their natural settings using Ecological Momentary Assessment, while also recording their circumstances in nonsmoking moments. SS+ were defined as ITS who were with others when they smoked most of their cigarettes, and who were ≥50% more likely to be with others when smoking than when not.

Results: Only 13% of ITS were SS+. Although defined solely on the basis of presence of others, SS+ showed a distinct pattern of smoking across multiple dimensions: compared to other ITS (who were significantly less likely to smoke when with others), SS+ smoking was more associated with socializing, being with friends and acquaintances, drinking alcohol, weekends, evening or nighttime, being in other people's homes, but not their own home. SS+ smoking was low in the morning and increased in the evening. SS+ smoked fewer days/week and were less dependent, but did not differ demographically.

Conclusions: Social smoking does constitute a highly distinct smoking pattern, but is not common among adult ITS.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:social smoking, intermittent smoking, ITS, non-daily smokers, ecological momentary assessment
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Public Health and Health Services
Research Field:Preventive Medicine
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health)
Objective Field:Substance Abuse
Author:Ferguson, SG (Associate Professor Stuart Ferguson)
ID Code:102079
Year Published:2015
Web of Science® Times Cited:4
Deposited By:Pharmacy
Deposited On:2015-07-27
Last Modified:2017-11-04
Downloads:0

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