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The introduction of a potentially abuse deterrent oxycodone formulation: Early findings from the Australian National Opioid Medications Abuse Deterrence (NOMAD) study

Citation

Degenhardt, L and Bruno, R and Ali, R and Lintzeris, N and Farrell, M and Larance, B, The introduction of a potentially abuse deterrent oxycodone formulation: Early findings from the Australian National Opioid Medications Abuse Deterrence (NOMAD) study, Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 151 pp. 56-67. ISSN 0376-8716 (2015) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI: doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2015.02.038

Abstract

Background: There is increasing concern about tampering of pharmaceutical opioids. We describe early findings from an Australian study examining the potential impact of the April 2014 introduction of an abuse-deterrent sustained-release oxycodone formulation (Reformulated OxyContin).

Methods: Data on pharmaceutical opioid sales; drug use by people who inject drugs regularly (PWID); client visits to the Sydney Medically Supervised Injecting Centre (MSIC); and last drug injected by clients of inner-Sydney needle-syringe programmes (NSPs) were obtained, 2009-2014. A cohort of n=606 people tampering with pharmaceutical opioids was formed pre-April 2014, and followed up May-August 2014.

Results: There were declines in pharmacy sales of 80mg OxyContin post-introduction of the reformulated product, the dose most commonly diverted and injected by PWID. Reformulated OxyContin was among the least commonly used and injected drugs among PWID. This was supported by Sydney NSP data. There was a dramatic reduction in MSIC visits for injection of OxyContin post-introduction of the new formulation (from 62% of monthly visits pre-introduction to 5% of visits, August 2014). The NOMAD cohort confirmed a reduction in OxyContin use/injection post-introduction. Reformulated OxyContin was cheaper and less attractive for tampering than Original OxyContin.

Conclusions: These data suggest that, in the short term, introduction of an abuse-deterrent formulation of OxyContin in Australia was associated with a reduction in injection of OxyContin, with no clear switch to other drugs. Reformulated OxyContin, in this short follow-up, does not appear to be considered as attractive for tampering.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:pharmaceutical opioids, post-marketing surveillance, abuse deterrence, tamper resistance, opioid dependence, injecting drug usea
Research Division:Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Research Group:Psychology
Research Field:Psychology not elsewhere classified
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health)
Objective Field:Substance Abuse
Author:Bruno, R (Associate Professor Raimondo Bruno)
ID Code:101838
Year Published:2015
Funding Support:National Health and Medical Research Council (APP1022522)
Web of Science® Times Cited:19
Deposited By:Psychology
Deposited On:2015-07-12
Last Modified:2017-11-07
Downloads:0

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