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Southern Ocean iron enrichment experiment: carbon cycling in high- and low-Si waters

Citation

Coale, KH and Johnson, KS and Chavez, FP and Buesseler, KO and Barber, RT and Brzezinski, MA and Cochlan, WP and Millero, FJ and Falkowski, PG and Bauer, JE and Wanninkhof, RH and Kudela, RM and Altabet, MA and Hales, BE and Takahashi, T and Landry, MR and Bidigare, RR and Wang, X and Chase, Z and Strutton, PG and Friederich, GE and Gorbunov, MY and Lance, VP and Hilting, AK and Hiscock, MR and Demarest, M and Hiscock, WT and Sullivan, KF and Tanner, SJ and Gordon, RM and Hunter, CN and Elrod, VA and Fitzwater, SE and Jones, JL and Tozzi, S and Koblizek, M and Roberts, AE and Herndon, J and Brewster, J and Ladizinsky, N and Smith, G and Cooper, D and Timothy, D and Brown, SL and Selph, KE and Sheridan, CC and Twining, BS and Johnson, ZI, Southern Ocean iron enrichment experiment: carbon cycling in high- and low-Si waters, Science, 304, (5669) pp. 408-414. ISSN 0036-8075 (2004) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright 2004 The American Association for the Advancement of Science

DOI: doi:10.1126/science.1089778

Abstract

The availability of iron is known to exert a controlling influence on biological productivity in surface waters over large areas of the ocean and may have been an important factor in the variation of the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide over glacial cycles. The effect of iron in the Southern Ocean is particularly important because of its large area and abundant nitrate, yet iron-enhanced growth of phytoplankton may be differentially expressed between waters with high silicic acid in the south and low silicic acid in the north, where diatom growth may be limited by both silicic acid and iron.Twomesoscaleexperiments, designed to investigate the effects of ironenrichment in regions with high and low concentrations of silicic acid, were performed in the Southern Ocean. These experiments demonstrate ironís pivotal role in controlling carbon uptake and regulating atmospheric partial pressure of carbon dioxide.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Research Division:Earth Sciences
Research Group:Oceanography
Research Field:Chemical Oceanography
Objective Division:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Group:Expanding Knowledge
Objective Field:Expanding Knowledge in the Earth Sciences
Author:Chase, Z (Associate Professor Zanna Chase)
ID Code:101434
Year Published:2004
Web of Science® Times Cited:397
Deposited By:IMAS Research and Education Centre
Deposited On:2015-06-24
Last Modified:2015-09-23
Downloads:0

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