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A randomized double-blind crossover study of indoor air filtration and acute changes in cardiorespiratory health in a First Nations community

Citation

Weichenthal, S and Mallach, G and Kulka, R and Black, A and Wheeler, A and You, H and St-Jean, M and Kwiatkowski, R and Sharp, D, A randomized double-blind crossover study of indoor air filtration and acute changes in cardiorespiratory health in a First Nations community, Indoor Air, 23, (3) pp. 175-184. ISSN 0905-6947 (2013) [Refereed Article]

Copyright Statement

Copyright Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2012

DOI: doi:10.1111/ina.12019

Abstract

Few studies have examined indoor air quality in First Nations communities and its impact on cardiorespiratory health. To address this need, we conducted a crossover study on a First Nations reserve in Manitoba, Canada, including 37 residents in 20 homes. Each home received an electrostatic air filter and a placebo filter for 1 week in random order, and lung function, blood pressure, and endothelial function measures were collected at the beginning and end of each week. Indoor air pollutants were monitored throughout the study period. Indoor PM2.5 decreased substantially during air filter weeks relative to placebo (mean difference: 37 μg/m(3) , 95% CI: 10, 64) but remained approximately five times greater than outdoor concentrations owing to a high prevalence of indoor smoking. On average, air filter use was associated with a 217-ml (95% CI: 23, 410) increase in forced expiratory volume in 1 s, a 7.9-mm Hg (95% CI: -17, 0.82) decrease in systolic blood pressure, and a 4.5-mm Hg (95% CI: -11, 2.4) decrease in diastolic blood pressure. Consistent inverse associations were also observed between indoor PM2.5 and lung function. In general, our findings suggest that reducing indoor PM2.5 may contribute to improved lung function in First Nations communities.

PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Indoor air quality is known to contribute to adverse cardiorespiratory health, but few studies have examined indoor air quality in First Nations communities. Our findings suggest that indoor PM2.5 may contribute to reduced lung function and that portable air filters may help to alleviate these effects by effectively reducing indoor levels of particulate matter.

Item Details

Item Type:Refereed Article
Keywords:Indoor air quality, health, intervention, air filter
Research Division:Medical and Health Sciences
Research Group:Public Health and Health Services
Research Field:Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
Objective Division:Health
Objective Group:Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health)
Objective Field:Environmental Health
Author:Wheeler, A (Dr Amanda Wheeler)
ID Code:101126
Year Published:2013
Web of Science® Times Cited:19
Deposited By:Menzies Institute for Medical Research
Deposited On:2015-06-10
Last Modified:2017-12-12
Downloads:0

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